Hungarian Sauerkraut – Székelygulyás

Ingredients:Vegan Vegetarian Variation
2 lbs Pork Loin, cubed 1/2 inch
1 1/2 lbs Sauerkraut, rinsed and drained
1/2 cup White Onion, minced
2 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
4 Tbsp Sweet Paprika (Hungarian preferred)
2 cloves Garlic, minced
1 tsp Caraway Seeds
2 cups Tomatoes, crushed
1/2 cup Brown Sugar
2 Bay Leaves
1 cup Barley
1 1/2 cups Water
1/2 cup Sour Cream
Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions:

  • In a large pot, brown the Pork, Onion, and Garlic in the Vegetable Oil.
  • Add the Paprika and Caraway Seeds and saute for 3 minutes.
  • Add all other ingredients except the Sour Cream and mix well in the pot so that everything is incorporated.
  • Pour into a deep baking dish and bake for 30-45 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, and stir in the Sour Cream.

NOTES: This style of Sauerkraut is inherited from my family. I’ve heard about it being done with Ketchup instead of Stewed Tomatoes, but I just can’t bring myself to do that. The recipe came verbally from my paternal grandmother’s maternal grandmother Elisabeth Stefani Schwarz Lanser. The use of Tomatoes is a Hungarian/Slovak influence. She was from the town of Metzenseifen, now Medzev in Slovakia on the Hungarian border. The town consisted of Germans who had moved there in the 13th century. One can see the influence of the three cultures in this dish. The Hungarian name Székelygulyás signifies that this is thick cabbage goulash.

Variations:
Substitute sliced Kielbasa or Roast Duck for the Pork
Spice it Up: Add 1/2 tsp Hot Paprika or Cayenne Pepper

M›Ɣ – Leaving out the Pork Loin, will still yield a very tasty Sauerkraut.

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One CommentLeave a comment

  1. This is good stuff – perhaps best not consumed as the sole ingredient in a dinner (as I did), but really interesting flavour. The paprika makes this taste almost like some hybrid between traditional east european sauerkraut and an Indonesian dish. Well worth trying!


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