Almaunde Gingyuer Sawse for Capouns Ysode – Chicken in an Almond-Ginger Sauce

Almaund Gingyeur Sawse for Capouns Ysode

Ingredients:
1 Roasting Hen
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 head garlic/top removed.

Bouquet Garni:
2 Bay Leaves
2 Sprigs Rosemary
2-4 Sprigs Parsley

Sauce:
1 cup Almonds, raw or blanched (preferably)
1/2 cup Ginger, diced
3 Tbsp Butter
1 cup Chicken Stock
1/2 cup White Wine
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar
1 tsp Allspice
1 tsp Cinnamon
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp Corn Starch

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 325°F
  • Wash Chicken inside and out, and wipe dry.
  • Stuff the Bouquet Garni and Garlic Head into the Chicken.
  • Truss and tie the legs together.
  • Sprinkle Chicken with Salt and Pepper to taste.
  • Roast the Chicken, uncovered, breast side up. Baste it occasionally–the more you baste, the juicier the meat. You should allow 30 minutes per pound or until a meat thermometer placed in the breast reads 160°F. Be sure not to be touching a bone with the probe.
  • Using a food processor, combine all ingredients of the Sauce.
  • Pulse until the Sauce is smooth
  • On a low heat, cook in a Sauce Pot until a rolling boil, stirring constantly.
  • Carve the Chicken and plate.
  • The Sauce may be poured over the Chicken, or used for dipping.

Makes 1 Roasting Hen, (2-4 servings, depending on size).

NOTES: This recipe is one that I came up with reading Medieval English recipes. It is really a hybrid of two recipes, Sawce Gingyeur and Sawce Blaunche for Capons Ysode. Both recipes are below in the original Middle English. The sauce came as an inspiration also from reading the ingredients purchased by a King of France while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London–his “court” served roast chicken and lamb covered in a Ginger and Almond sauce. Unfortunately, that mere reference was not enough for a recipe–so I compared it to what recipes were available to me and came up with this sauce. For the choices of ingredients, I wanted to use fresh Ginger, as that was what was used by imprisoned king’s chef.  I added a few spices that would be commonly used at the time, and substituted cornstarch for the process of straining vinegar-soaked bread for thickening.  Also, as it is not common to find verijuice, I used a combination of White Wine Vinegar and White Wine.  Finally, I did add Butter and Chicken Stock to add a smooth and rich texture and flavor.  Though this may not be a word-for-word rendition of a recorded Medieval recipe, I do feel it is in the style and spirit of one.

Sawce Gingyeur
Take white brede, stepe it with vynegre, and draw it .ij. or .iij. tymes thurgh a straynour; and thanne put ther-to poudre gingere, and serue forthe.

–from Ashmole MS 1439

Sawce Blaunche for Capouns Ysode
Take almaundes blaunched and grynde hem al to doust; temper hit vp with verious and powdour of gyngyuer, and messe it forth.

–from 140. Curye on Inglish: English Culinary Manuscripts of the Fourteenth-Century

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Céleri Rémoulade – Celeriac Salad

Céleri Rémoulade

Ingredients:
1 Celeriac Bulb, cleaned
1 Carrot, cleaned
1 small Cucumber, seeded and Julianne cut.
3 Shallots, thinly sliced
1/2 – 1 cup Walnuts, crushed
1 cup Greek-Style Yoghurt
1 Tbsp Honey
3 Tbsp Almond Oil
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar
1 Tbsp Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp fresh Mint, minced
1 Tbsp fresh Dill, minced
2 tsp ground Ginger
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp Pepper

Directions:

  • Clean the Celeriac root by removing any scraggly roots and outer surface. Cut into pieces small enough to be easy to grate. I prefer to use my Food Processor’s food grater, so I make the pieces big enough to fit through the feeder. If you shred by hand, you may want them a good size for holding. Do the same thing with the Carrot.
  • Shred both the Celeriac and Carrot.
  • In a large bowl, combine the Celeriac, Carrot, Shallots, Cucumber, and Walnuts, and toss with your hands to mix well.
  • In a separate bowl combine all remaining ingredients and whisk together into a dressing.
  • Pour the dressing over the dry ingredients and mix well.

NOTES: Celeriac is one of those under-used vegetables in my opinion. Honestly, I don’t know why–its not too difficult to prepare, and you can eat it raw or cooked in any way imaginable that most root vegetables are cooked. Now regarding the Rémoulade itself. Traditionally, this would be made with Mayonnaise, and would not have Ginger and maybe a different set of spices. I found that a little bland and had to add some kick to it, but not overpower the fresh-taste of the Celeriac itself. The Rémoulade can be served as a side dish, or in a similar fashion to Cole Slaw–though it is not as strong. Many folks serve it as a side to fish. I prefer to eat it by itself as a side salad.

Creamy Red Coleslaw

Dedicated to The Rev. Tommy S., my Southern brother in Christ and friend in Dorothy, in honor of his recent move.

Creamy Red Coleslaw

Ingredients:
1 head Red Cabbage (about 4 cups shredded, shredded finely
1 large Carrot, shredded
1/4 Yellow Onion, grated
1 1/4 cup Mayonnaise
1 Tbsp Dijon Mustard
Juice of 1 Lemon
Juice of 1 Lime
1/4 cup White Wine Vinegar
2 Tbsp Sugar (more or less to taste)
1 tsp fresh Ginger, grated
1/4 cup Raisins
2 Tbsp Sesame Seeds
1 tsp Herbes de Provence
1 tsp fresh Chives
1 tsp Steak Spice Rub
Salt and Black Pepper to Taste

Directions:

  • In a large bowl, combine the Cabbage, Carrots, Ginger, Onion, and Raisins. Toss together.
  • In a gallon-size zipping baggy, combine the Mayonnaise, Dijon Mustard, Chives, Herbes de Provence, Steak Spice Rub, Salt and Pepper, Sugar, Juices, and Vinegar. Seal and mix well.
  • Pour over the top of the Cabbage Mix, and sprinkle with the Sesame Seeds.
  • Fold the mixture together until everything is coated.

NOTES: This is a tangy flavorful Cole Slaw that is very creamy. If you do not have Herbes de Provence, then you can substitute with Parsley, Basil, and a little Oregano and Thyme… just make sure the total amount is similar. This can be saved, sealed, for a week, and will become more flavorful as you go.

Variations:
S›Ƨ – Substitute Splenda® for the Sugar.

Chicken in Dijon Cream Sauce

Inspired by and dedicated to Chef Philippe Fallait and his wife Mary
Chicken in Dijon Creme Sauce with Lemon-Steamed Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients:
4 thinly sliced Chicken Breast fillets
4 Tbsp Dijon Mustard (removed from container)
1/2 tsp Olive Oil
2 cups Table Mushrooms, sliced
1 tsp White Wine Vinegar
1 cup Heavy Cream
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 Tbsp fresh Chives, diced

Directions:

  • Liberally coat the Chicken Breasts with the Dijon Mustard on both sides.
  • Let sit for 10 minutes, as you heat up a skillet with just enough Olive Oil to coat lightly.
  • When the skillet is hot, brown the Chicken breasts on both sides, on medium heat.
  • Remove and set to the side.
  • Pour in the White Wine Vinegar, and scrap off the pieces of Mustard and Chicken.
  • Add the Mushrooms and let brown.
  • Add the Heavy Cream, Salt, Pepper, and any remaining Dijon Mustard.
  • Heat for about five minutes, stirring well, and mixing well until bubbly.
  • Add the chicken breasts back to the pan and let cook for another 5 minutes coating them with the Mustard Cream Sauce.
  • Plate the chicken, cover with Mushrooms and Sauce, and garnish with the diced Chives.

Makes 2 servings (2 pieces per person)

NOTES: When using the Dijon Mustard, remove it from the container and keep in a bowl or on a plate to prevent cross-contamination. Any Dijon Mustard not used from that plate can be scraped into the Heavy Cream when cooking.

This recipe was shared with me by my good friend Chef Philippe Fallait, who is the owner of Cafe Triskell. He didn’t give me the measurements, but I would not have this recipe without him. He’s an excellent chef, and a good friend.

Variations:
Chicken Dijon Baked with Artichokes

Dijon Mustard

Dijon Mustard

Ingredients:
1/4 cup whole Mustard Seeds
1 Tbsp Dry Mustard
1-2 cloves Garlic
1 Shallot
1 Tbsp Capers, minced
1 tsp Herbes de Provence
1 tsp Honey
2 Tbsp Sauvignon Blanc
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar
1 Tbsp Bordeaux
1 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
1 tsp Olive Oil
1/2 tsp Black Pepper
1/2 tsp Salt

Directions:

  • Grate the Garlic and Shallot into a bowl, and press out the liquid and drain.
  • Using a Mortar and Pestle, crush the Mustard Seed. You do not have to pulverize the seeds, just crushing some will release the oils.
  • Combine the Mustard Seed, and Herbes, Spices and Seasonings with the Garlic and Shallots. Slowly add the Wines, Vinegars, Oil, and Honey.
  • Cover and refrigerate over night.
  • Pour into a food processor and blend until desired consistency.

NOTES: Dijon Mustard was created by Jean Naigeon of Dijon in 1856, and utilized a wine made from un-riped grapes often called Verjuice, which has a high acidity. Most modern recipes have substituted it with a combination of White Wine, Red Wine, White Wine Vinegar, and Red Wine Vinegar–you can find varying portions of each depending on a recipe. Regardless, the wines should be dry, and of a high quality worth drinking.

You have control over the coarseness of the mustard when you grind it in the food processor. I prefer a coarser grind. You can also utilize various colors of Mustard Seeds, as available to give it some extra color.

Skordalia – Σκορδαλιά – Garlic Potato Dip

Ingredients:Nut Alergy WarningVegan
Water for Boiling
1 Tbsp Salt
2 Russet Potatoes, skinned, cut into chunks
8 – 10 cloves of Garlic, crushed
1/2 cup blanched Almonds
1 cup Olive Oil
1/3 cup White Wine Vinegar
Juice of 1 Lemon
1/4 tsp White Pepper

Directions:

  • In a large pot place the Water, Salt, and Potatoes, and bring to a boil. Cook until fork-tender.
  • Drain the Potatoes and add put them in a Food Processor.
  • Add the Almonds and Garlic, and pulse.
  • Drizzle in the Olive Oil, Vinegar, and Lemon Juice.
  • Add the Pepper, then Salt to taste.

NOTES: I live in Astoria, and this dish is served with several other dips as an appetizer with Pita. It is also commonly paired with fried fish and vegetables. The name is probably a pleonastic compound or combination of two languages: σκόρδο which is Greek for “garlic” and agliata which is Italian for “garlicky”. Very appropriate.

Variations:
Macedonian Skordalia: substitute Walnuts for the Almonds

Ɲ – Leave out the Nuts; this does not take away from the authenticity of the dish, as many do not include nuts in the recipe.